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The Divine Comedy by Dante AlighieriHenry Wadsworth Longfellow
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The Divine Comedy

by Dante AlighieriHenry Wadsworth Longfellow

26 ratings, 9 reviews

The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia, later christened “Divina” by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, the last great work of literature of the Middle Ages and the first great work of the Renaissance. A culmination of the medieval world-view of the afterlife, it establishes the Tuscan dialect in which it is written as the Italian standard, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature.

The Divine Comedy is composed of three canticas (or “cantiche”) — Inferno (Hell), Purgatorio (Purgatory), and Paradiso (Paradise) — composed each of 33 cantos (or “canti”). The very first canto serves as an introduction to the poem and is generally not considered to be part of the first cantica, bringing the total number of cantos to 100.

The poet tells in the first person his travel through the three realms of the dead, lasting during the Easter Triduum in the spring of 1300.

(Summary from Wikipedia)

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26 ratings, 9 reviews
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Justin Beveridge

November 20, 2554

Good

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Aew Mesub

May 21, 2554

Funny

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Joanne Stecker Butzier

January 25, 2013

There are a number of books I want to read before I die, The Divine Comedy by Dante was only one of them. A true classic, although not an easy read, describes Dante's vision of hell, purgatory, and heaven as well as his belief that we all are accountable in this life and shall reap what we sow in the next. He believes that though we leave our flesh and bones behind when we die, our souls move on to be either punished or rewarded as a result of our decisions during our life on earth.

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Sveta Harmon

October 04, 2012

Bla bla bla

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Anna Godess

August 15, 2012

Enjoyable and interesting if somewhat needing concentration. Very grateful to readers for this excellent rendition.

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Nina Rapp

August 13, 2012

Awesome good reader

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Elizabeth Grant

July 22, 2012

Very interesting book!

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Fred Didyoung

May 11, 2012

I loved it! Having poor vision makes reading hard

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Francesco Ferrante

February 12, 2012

Good